Roll-And-Write Research

When I wanted to go design a roll-and-write game, I ended up doing a lot of research before I actually got to the design stage. The great thing about roll-and-write games is that they are manageable within a research context. That is to say, they are affordable and small enough to be able to compare and contrast a lot of these games. While doing so, I ended up having more and more notes, to the point where I might as well write a book on the genre. Instead of writing a book, though, I thought it would be wiser to make a living document that changes to reflect what roll-and-write games are and what they contain. The document should both be a guide book for both players and designers alike. I’m expecting that March 2019 will see the start of actually putting chapters and paragraphs online. Below is an outline of the project:

  • Introduction
  • Part 1: The Basics
    • 1.1: What is a Roll-and-Write game?
    • 1.2: Sheets, Spaces, and Values
    • 1.3: Randomization
    • 1.4: Participation
    • 1.5: Set Collection
    • 1.6: Push Your Luck Mechanics
    • 1.7: Writing and Permanence, or Forward-only Gameplay
    • 1.8: Player Interaction
  • Part 2: Designing Roll-and-Write Games
    • 2.1: Components
    • 2.2: Probability
    • 2.3: Player Sheet Design
    • 2.4: Game End and Scoring
    • […]
  • Part 3: Mechanics
    • 3.1: Action Following
    • 3.2: Dice Drafting
    • 3.3: Non-Standard Randomization
    • 3.4: Turn Limit
    • 3.5: Re-Rolling
    • 3.6: Solo or Solitaire Play
    • […]
  • Part 4: Sub-Genres
    • 4.1: Route Building
    • 4.2: Tile Placement
    • […]
  • Part 5: Game Summaries
    • 5.1: Harvest Dice (2016)
    • 5.2: Twenty One (2017)
    • 5.3: Welcome To… (2018)
    • […]
  • Part 6: Example Games
    • 6.1: Farming: The Dice Game (Action Following and Dice Drafting)
    • […]
  • Appendix A: Table of Games and Mechanics
  • Appendix B: Glossary of Terms Used